Sir Digit Izer and the Champion Word of the Week: Mamihlapinatapai

Sir Digit Izer

“I, Sir Digit Izer, of the Library of Berthoud, herby proclaim “Mamihlapinatapai” as your champion word of the week (Pronounced ma-mE-la-pin-ya-ta-pl):

*To be spoken in a very proper, High English, accent* “Refers to “a look shared by two people, each wishing that the other will offer something that they both desire but are unwilling to suggest or offer themselves.”

A slightly different interpretation of the meaning also exists: “It is that look across the table when two people are sharing an unspoken but private moment. When each knows the other understands and is in agreement with what is being expressed. An expressive and meaningful silence.”

“I, Sir Digit Izer, leave you with this image of the greatest examples of Mamihlapinatapai known to man”:

Mamihlapinatapai bacon

Reading Matters: Article from The Greeley Tribune

We would like to a take a moment to share with you an article that showcases a fellow Colorado Library, High Plains Library District. This library is dedicated to providing the best service possible to their patrons and the community.

Reading Matters

High Plains Library District is fighting to show people that the Internet is not the end-all when it comes to resources available for patrons. While not all libraries in Colorado have been as lucky, High Plains Library District has had the funding to keep up with the changing role of libraries.

Here are some of the many services offered by High Plains Library:

Music Downloads and Streaming

Ebook and Audiobooks

Citizenship and Computer Basic Classes

Digital Museum Archives

Access to Subscription-only Information

Free Genealogy Research

Personalized Reading Lists

Kids’ Programs

Book a Librarian

Mobile MyLibrary App

To read the full article, click here.

STEM STUFF: Chemical makeup of water

The theme for STEM STUFF this month is: WATER!

Stem Stuff

“Dr. Scientific, let’s get…well…scientific!  Can you tell us more about the chemical makeup of water?

Dr. Scientific says: YES! Water is the chemical substance with the formula H2O, and it has one molecule of water and two hydrogen atoms. It can appear is all three common states of matter, which are solid, liquid and gas and it takes many, many different forms on our planet.  Can you think of any of those forms? (Think clouds, or seawater, maybe even ice!)

Water is is a very good polar solvent, which basically means it can dissolve other substances very well, like salt and sugar and some gases.  These items are hydrophilic in nature, which means “water-loving”. Some substances, however, are hydrophobic or, “water-fearing”.

 EXPERIMENT TIME: 

Ask a parent to gather different ingredients from your kitchen.  See which ones will dissolve in water.  See which ones will not.  Write down your list of hydrophilic and hydrophobic substances.

Learn more about water with this fun short video by CrashCourse Biology:

Sir Digit Izer and the Champion Word of the Week: Whiffler

Sir Digit Izer

“I, Sir Digit Izer, of the Library of Berthoud, herby proclaim “Whiffler” as your champion word of the week:

*To be spoken in a very proper, High English, accent* Whifflers went in front of a procession to clear spectators from its path. In early times, they would have been men-at-arms, wielding their customary weapons such as javelins or swords to keep back the mob. They survived until the middle of the nineteenth century in the procession of the London craft guilds to the Guildhall banquet on Lord Mayor’s Day, in which young freemen called bachelor whifflers carried flags to lead each guild. In an entry written a century ago, the Oxford English Dictionary finds the word’s origin in the Old English wifle for a spear or battleaxe, whiffle also referred to the wind when it blew in puffs or slight gusts, or veered or shifted about.

“I, Sir Digit Izer, leave you with this image of the greatest Whiffler known to man:

Whiffler

Reading Matters: Sign up for a library card

Reading Matters

The public library is an invaluable part of our community, offering a wide variety of services to people all around the world. We would like to showcase an article recently published by Wall Street Journal as they explore E-book availabilities from different companies versus the San Francisco and Richland County public libraries.

From the Wall Street Journal: 

A growing stack of companies would like you to pay a monthly fee to read e-books, just like you subscribe to Netflix NFLX +1.17% to binge on movies and TV shows.

Don’t bother. Go sign up for a public library card instead.

But it turns out librarians haven’t just been sitting around shushing people while the Internet drove them into irrelevance. More than 90% of American public libraries have amassed e-book collections you can read on your iPad, and often even on a Kindle. You don’t have to walk into a branch or risk an overdue fine. And they’re totally free.

Below is a chart comparing the different availability options for top sellers of 2013:

 

How They Stack Up

E-book subscription services don’t always have the big-name e-books available at some public libraries. Below, a comparison in the availability of books on three services—Oyster, Kindle Unlimited and Scribd—with the public libraries in San Francisco and Richland County, S.C. We compared Amazon’s top 20 best-sellers on Kindle from 2013, as well as a more esoteric list of author Stephen King’s 10 favorites. (Note: Some library books required a wait before becoming available.)

Amazon Kindle Top 2013
Oyster
Kindle Unlimited
Scribd
SFPL
RCPL
Inferno by Dan Brown (Doubleday)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Divergent by Veronica Roth (Tegen)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn (Crown)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Sycamore Row by John Grisham (Doubleday)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty (Putnam)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Safe Haven by Nicholas Sparks (Grand Central)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Allegiant by Veronica Roth (Tegen)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Insurgent by Veronica Roth (Tegen)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith (Mulholland)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak (Knopf)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini (Riverhead)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (Scribner)
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
The Hit by David Baldacci (Grand Central)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (Speak)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card (Tor)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Hopeless by Colleen Hoover (Colleen Hoover)
No
No
Yes
No
No
Entwined With You by Sylvia Day (Berkley)
No
No
No
Yes
No
Never Go Back by Lee Child (Delacorte)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins (Scholastic)
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Alex Cross, Run by James Patterson (Little, Brown)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Stephen King’s favorite books
The Golden Argosy edited by Van H. Cartmell and Charles Grayson (Dial Press-Out of Print)
No
No
No
No
No
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (Public Domain)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie (Random House)
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
McTeague by Frank Norris (Public Domain)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Lord of the Flies by William Golding (Penguin)
No
No
No
Yes
No
Bleak House by Charles Dickens (Public Domain)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
1984 by George Orwell (New American Library)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
The Raj Quartet by Paul Scott (Everyman’s Library)
No
No
No
No
No
Light in August by William Faulkner (Vintage Books)
No
No
No
Yes
No
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy (Vintage Books)
No
No
No
Yes
No

To read Wall Street’s full article, click here.

Ask a LiBRAINian: Happy Left Hander’s Day!

LiBRAINian

 

We thought it would be appropriate for today’s “Ask a LiBRAINian” to showcase our wonderful left handed people out there in honor of Left Hander’s day! 

DID YOU KNOW:

  • Left Hander’s Day was first celebrated on the 13th of August in 1976, and was meant to promote the awareness of left-handers in a right-handed world.  Left handed people make up 7 to 10% of the world’s population
  • The University of Montpellier in France surveyed nine primitive societies in five separate continents.  They found that in sports like boxing, tennis, and even in fights, left handed people had the upper hand (get it?) because of their opponent was surprised by the attack coming from the left, which isn’t generally anticipated.
  • Some studies suggest that around 50% of cats are left handed
  • Three of the last four presidents have been left-handed: President Obama, President George H.W. Bush and President Clinton.
  • While left-handed people might be better as certain sport, they also excel in careers focused on the arts! And they are better and 3D perception and thought processing.
    • Famous Left handed intellectuals:
      • Albert Einstein
      • Isaac Newton
      • Charles Darwin
      • Benjamin Franklin.

Experiment:

If you’re right-handed, you might not even realize how different it would be to use every day objects with your left hand instead.  Try using these objects with your left-hand for a day to see how well you do!  Image how a left-handed person might try to adapt.

Scissors

Cutting bread

Opening a can with a can opener

Peeling a piece of fruit

Writing in a notebook

Using garden pruners

Raise your left hand in one accord as we celebrate and honor our beloved lefties of this world!

Keep left and carry on